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A Comprehensive Guide to the Best Mountain Bike Dropper Posts from 31 Brands

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9point8 Fall Line The Fall Line is the lightest post we looked at by a notable margin. The company offers a “second bike” kit for $47, so you can spread the love across your stable.

BikeYoke Revive Every post can suffer from air sneaking into places it is not supposed to go, causing it to perform poorly. Bike Yoke has created a release valve to reset the system without having to take anything apart. All you do is loosen a 4mm bolt at the head, run the drop through its travel once, then tighten the bolt. Voila, the system is reset.

Buy the Revive at JensonUSA

Bontrager Drop Line Trek claims that the Drop Line is one component you can always depend on. “Dropper posts are awesome until they’re not. That’s why we created the Drop Line to be the one you can rely on. From installation to activation, no other dropper post can withstand the rigors of real-world riding and just keep functioning.”

BMC Trailsync The Trailsync allows riders to lower the post and open the rear suspension with one lever, simplifying the cockpit and pre-descent checklist.

Brand-X Ascend One of the most affordable posts in the mix, the Brand-X Ascend is said to be quite reliable and isn’t even the heaviest post on the list.

Crankbrothers Highline The Highline claims to have “the world’s most ergonomic remote,” and comes with a solid 3-year warranty.

Buy the Highline at REI

DVO Garnet DVO claims that the Garnet dropper post is intentionally simple and reliable, with no wheels reinvented. Return speed is adjustable by adding or releasing air pressure at the head of the post.

Compare prices on the DVO Garnet

e*thirteen TRS+ Like the PNW Rainier post, the TRS+ uses a coil system in place of compressed air. This means “less maintenance than air sprung posts with a smooth, consistent return speed every time, for the life of the post,” according to e*thirteen.

Easton Haven The Haven dropper post has a “Quick Connector feature [that] allows tool-free easy disconnection from internal cable routing without losing tension settings, making it easy to remove the post or share between two bikes.”

Eightpins Standard on Liteville frames and hopefully soon others, the Eightpins post is fully integrated into the frame. The designers used the frame’s seat tube in place of the outer/lower post, cutting weight and allowing the post to drop all of the way to the frame.

Fox Transfer “The Fox Transfer return rate can be modulated at the lever, which is a nice option to have. Pressing on the lever firmly brings the post up right away, while a light touch slowly eases the saddle up.” -Jeff Barber

FSA Flowtron “The Flowtron takes its name from a fast, rolling flow trail in the Pacific Northwest. A forged, shifter-style remote and industry-first, adjustable spring tension enables the rider to customize the lever feel and force.”

Funn UpDown Internal Like the BikeYoke design, the UpDown cartridge can be easily reset to keep it working like new, and the post is fully user-serviceable.

Giant Contact SL Switch The Switch has extra long rail cradles, designed to grip the delicate rails of light saddles adequately. Giant says the post can be easily switched between external and internal routing as needed.

Kind Shock E30-I “Based on a few bad experiences in the past, I’m always stoked when a dropper post works right out of the box, and the E30-I does not disappoint. Throughout my testing, it dropped when I asked it to drop, and it returned when summoned. It doesn’t get any simpler than that, and if you’re looking for a post that just does the job, you can stop reading here.” Jeff Barber

Magura Vyron Well, it’s electric. It’s wireless. You could swap it from one bike to the next in a matter of minutes. Magura may not have all of the kinks worked out with the Vyron, but it is the way of the future for front-country mountain biking.

Manitou Jack Unfortunately we don’t have a lot of info on the Manitou Jack. This video offers a smattering of info about what is included with the post.

Marzocchi Transfer “Yes, Fox has a dropper seat post called the Transfer. Yes, Fox owns Marzocchi now. Yes, the Marzocchi Transfer is the same exact seat post as the Fox Transfer, but with a different name etched into it.” -Matt Miller

OneUp posts’ travel can be adjusted to the precise max height you desire, within a 50mm range. So, you can set up a 150mm post to top out anywhere between 100 and 150mm. This 170mm travel post is tuned to top out at 163mm, providing the proper saddle height and maximum travel for the rider.

OneUp Dropper The folks at One Up have designed a lightweight, solid post with 50mm of adjustable travel. If you buy a post with 170mm of travel, but your frame will only let you use 168mm or 152mm of that travel, that’s okay. The adjustment process doesn’t require any tools and can be completed in about two minutes.

Compare prices on the OneUp Dropper

PNW Components Rainier IR “The PNW Rainier IR is easily one of the best sub-$200 dropper posts on the market today. The only compromises buyers are making compared to much pricier posts are the weight and the lack of a tunable air cartridge. However, by giving up the latter, buyers are actually getting a post that should be more reliable in varying conditions and over time.” -Jeff Barber

Race Face Turbine Leave it to a Canadian brand to focus on cold-weather riding. “Lower air pressures and static seals offer unrivaled performance, control, and reliability. Turbine also operates in below-freezing temperatures making it perfect for Fat Bikes and cold-weather riding.”

Rockshox Reverb Stealth This gold-standard dropper was recently redesigned, and Rockshox has had plenty of time to work out the kinks. The Reverb now drops up to 170mm and can be ordered with a shifter-style remote.

SDG Tellis One of the latest companies to play on the dropper field, SDG spent the past two seasons perfecting the Tellis with professional riders and testers. They claim to have the softest lever action in the business, and one of the most durable cartridge systems available.

Compare prices on the SDG Tellis

Shimano Pro Koryak Alongside KS Suspension, Shimano offers the widest range of dropper sizes on the market. They are one of the few making a 27.2mm diameter post for XC bikes, and their post travel ranges from 70-170mm.

Specialized Command WU With DH and dirt-jump tech in mind, Specialized has designed the Command WU to angle the saddle nose up by 14° at its lowest point, then return to its original angle as it rises back. The lower rear of the saddle provides a bit more “effective drop.”

Thomson Covert Thomson claims that the Covert has the longest service interval in the industry. Need we say more?

Photo: Bikethomson.com

TranzX JD The TranzX is the second-least expensive post on the list, and is reportedly a durable option that users can service in the comfort of their own homes.

Ultimate Use Helix “Fundamentally simple, the British-made Helix avoids the pitfalls of the air & oil systems currently. Utilizing a helical shaft, its clutch is activated with a custom made, ‘mount anywhere,’ remote lever, allowing it to freely rise, fall, and lock at any height. Maximum drop of 125mm or 165mm available.”

Vecnum Moveloc2 The Movloc2 offers up to 200mm of travel, it’s light, and unfortunately, it only comes with external cable routing.

X-Fusion Manic The folks X-Fusion are making a bold claim here: “the action of [the Manic dropper post] feels super-duper smooth and far silkier than any dropper.”

Compare prices on the X-Fusion Manic

Yep Components Uptimizer HC This Swiss-made post is by far the most customizable of them all. After choosing the size you want, you can select the color of two different parts of the remote, and the color of the collar. Travel options for the Yep Uptimizer range from 80-155mm, and the 125mm post is available in a “tall” version for riders who need more post in their frame. The joystick-style lever can be pushed or pulled in nearly any direction to get the post to respond and can be mounted above or below either side of the bar.

Photo: Yep Components

Wow, what a load of droppers. Did we miss any? Is there one that you have had trouble with? Tell us about it in the comments below.